Cleaning up

5 Jan

I don’t have people to the house very often as typically in China you invite people to go out to eat.  As a change of pace, we decided to invite one of Li’s best friends and his family over and Li was going to cook.  Since it was Chinese fare, I become the prep cook, chopping veggies, picking up as we go along, making rice, etc.  If it’s western fare, I become the chef.

We had just about gotten everything prepped when I, rinsing some last vegetables moved the faucet.  It broke off in my hand.  Literally split into two pieces.

The original faucet

Water promptly squirted out of the hole onto the kitchen floor.  After I turned it off, we had to decide what we wanted to do.  Nothing was cooked yet, but almost everything was prepped.  Eventually we decided to cook the food first, then worry about the clean up.  There are two bathroom sinks, so worst comes to worst, we had a back-up.

After a great lunch, we approached the faucet.  The apartment complex said it would likely cost close to $100 USD to buy a new part and repair it.  Li has a friend who said that the estimate was grossly high.  Eventually we got a hold of our landlady and she said that she was fine with the complex’s price.

The next day, I went to the engineer’s office to give them a deposit so they could buy the new faucet, then went to run errands.  After I got back home, an engineer came to help fix it.  Despite a couple of issues – the water main in the hallway did not succeed in turning off the water in my apartment and there was a thick layer of black gunk I had to clean up afterwards, it was a relatively painless process.  The new faucet is stylish and best of all – it works.

Hopefully I won’t have to clean up again for a while.

The shiny new faucet - that works!

I have learned a new word – faucet – in Chinese.  It translates to water dragon head (水龙头), which when you think about it, makes sense.  Any plumbing stories to share?

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